Wednesday, March 26, 2014

Ingredients to Great Golf

People seem to think that to be a great golf player, you have to invest in the aesthetics of the game – top notch shoes, branded golf clubs, and a spotless golf cart cover to protect your golf cart. While it is true that these are definitely “important” facets to enhancing your game, you also need to be more conscious of two things: your golf swing and a support system, or more specifically, a caddy.

Image source: World Golf
Exercising control rather than losing restraint is better for a swing.
Most players, especially beginners, think that it is always better to exert more effort and give a swing more energy rather than holding back. The truth is, knowing how much force to put in a swing is better than going all the way and losing control, which usually ends up with balls landing on sand and water traps. A controlled and smooth swing is always better than an over-the-top one.

Of course, skills like having a great swing can be further improved with advice from veterans and experts. An outsider's opinion is always valuable not just to learn from their expertise, but also because they may give input on how a swing could be improved. A player can ask an instructor to look into his or her swing so that observations on what is done correctly and areas for improvement can be brought up.

Speaking of which, a caddy would be very beneficial as your main support system when in the course. Aside from taking care of everything from your golf cart cover to your clubs, he or she should also know how to advise you on your game. Here are some tips on finding a great caddy:

The caddy should be ready with all the equipment all the time.
Someone running helter-skelter to fetch whatever the golfer needs only when the time comes when they are needed is someone you must avoid. At a moment's notice, the caddy should be able to provide balls and tees without having to scramble a golf bag, because he already has them in his pocket. Of course, the caddy should be ready with an umbrella, a towel and some water for the golfer's comfort. In other words, the caddy should be at least twoo steps ahead in thinking of the golfer's needs.

The caddy should of course reach the tee ahead of the golfer.
The caddy should hold the bag in such a way that the golfer could choose a club and get it out of the bag without any difficulty. With a longer relationship, a caddy may already establish a deeper comfort level with the golfer, gibing him the chance to know the golfer better and perhaps fork out a club as a recommendation instead of letting the golfer choose. Of course, it goes without saying that the caddy should hand the tee and the ball to the golfer and not let the golfer be handed the bag for him or her to get the tee and ball by himself or herself.

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